Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Breakfast in Other Countries


An oyster omelet, known as a Hangtown Fry!

You know what I've always wondered? (Gonna tell you whether you do or not!)

Why don't ethnic restaurants -- Chinese, Italian, Mexican, etc. -- open earlier and have breakfast menus? Is their idea of breakfast so close to ours in the USA that it's simply a case of "Why bother?"

I have several readers outside of the USA. Maybe they can answer that question for me if my "home-grown" readers can't.

I'd look it up myself, if I wasn't feeling so damned lazy today... hence the uncharacteristically short post.

Thanks for your time.

36 comments:

  1. hey i would be down with that...
    i love trying new foods from around the world
    and breakfast would be a fun one to try

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    Replies
    1. When I went to Cancun, the restaurant in my hotel had a HUGE breakfast buffet... but it was all stuff one would see in an American restaurant. Not sure whether that was to cater to American tourists, though...

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  2. I used to waitress at a non-ethnic restaurant, and they experimented with serving breakfast for a while. They quit offering breakfast because they didn't make enough profit on that meal. That probably didn't answer your question.

    I would echo Brian tho--I would be game to try breakfast at an ethnic restaurant!

    Oh, and for some odd reason that Hangtown Fry looks extraordinarily yummy!

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    1. You may have hit on the answer, though... Maybe it wouldn't be cost-effective for these places to offer breakfast to us Americans!

      I've always wanted to try a Hangtown Fry, too. (Of course, in your case, it could just be a weird craving, eh?) It has nothing to do with the idea of "foreign" breakfasts, but I needed something "breakfasty" for an illustration!

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  3. Yuck is what I say anyway, but good question indeed at your feed. Must be a money thing. As you know many are cheap at another wing. Have to pay the staff more for hours, more food, more hassle, more. More is my answer at your shore.

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    1. I think you're right. Maybe most nationalities or ethnic groups don't have a breakfast menu that's substantially different from ours, so not enough customers would dine there as opposed to an American place.

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  4. This look absolutely delicious thanks God I breakfast!
    My breakfast is simple but delicious, Tea or coffe, toasted with jam (normally with my jams I made) today strawberry ,and sometimes orange juice:)
    But here you can find breakfast in some reastaurants, when I go to dentist with kids normally I dont breakfast so we go to some parts, they have sometimes cinnamon rolls, eggs, and my favorite ham and cheese sandwhich with capuccino I love it.
    The kids are like uou LOL
    They normally eat pizza when we go there!!!
    Im hungry again!

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    Replies
    1. Wow you know how to get gloria to be a blabbermouth

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    2. Thanks for the run-down, Gloria!

      And Pat, what did you expect from someone who writes a recipe blog? Of course food is one of her favorite subjects!

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    3. True! I love this post, anyway I tell more because I think you want to know about food in others countries:)

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  5. I still drink chocolate milk for breakfast. Probably will for the rest of my life.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. When I was in kindergarten, I went through a stage where I absolutely refused to drink "plain" milk. It had to be chocolate or strawberry.

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  6. Just coffee for me, please. Cream and sugar.

    I love omelettes, but not oysters. :)

    Do you remember when Wendy's served breakfast? Or maybe they only did that near Columbus, Ohio where I grew up beside the headquarters and original Wendy's. They made breakfast sandwiches that were really good..bacon, egg, tomato, etc. Who knows why they stopped...McD's is still going strong.

    I have a nephew in the Baltics/Estonia area and the typical breakfast there is a cold cut sandwich...kind of like what our lunch would be.

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    Replies
    1. Well, I knew you'd have to have your coffee.

      I love omelets and oysters! Love to try the combination!

      With one exception about an hour from where I grew up, there weren't any Wendy's in this area until about ten years ago. I don't recall their ever serving breakfast.

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    2. Betsy, have you ever tried smoked oysters? Everyone in our family loves them. We have them for a snack/treat once in a great while.

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    3. no, I've only had oysters once...in stuffing at Thanksgiving at my aunt's house. Ew. I kept wondering what the heck was wrong with that stuffing! I was about 12 years old. I love seafood but those just do not appeal to me at all. lol....

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    4. Silver, Janie is gonna love your new sidebar addition. :)

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    5. I don't think I would care for oysters in stuffing. I like oyster soup, and smoked oysters, but stuffing is pushing it........:(

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    6. Turkey stuffing with oysters doesn't even sound appetizing to me... and I love them in almost any form! Smoked, raw, fried...

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    7. So, you're saying I should give them a try? Hmmm....are they slimy?

      Yeah, the stuffing was bad...especially if you didn't know they were in it. A very strange taste when you're expecting sage, bread crumbs and turkey broth. haha.

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    8. You can all thank Gloria for finding that "Grammar Nazi" illustration, btw!

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    9. You may appreciate them more now that you're an adult, and you'd be eating them with prior knowledge. That was a dirty trick to play on a twelve-year-old! And no, they're not really slimy.

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    10. well, we all only know two grammar nazis. :)

      I don't think the stuffing was a trick...she just always made it that way. I think oyster dressing is more popular in the south.

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    11. Well, I didn't mean she purposely included oysters to freak you out... even if that was the end result. Ha.

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  7. I suspect that breakfasts such as we're used to, with a menu choice different than other meals of the day, is a uniquely European phenomenon. I know some Indian (from India) friends in my youth ate pretty much the same thing for breakfast as they had for lunch and supper. Ditto the Native Americans I'd met in the SW US. My brother goes to China twice a year for business; I'll have to ask him what breakfast is over there.

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    Replies
    1. Wow, I'm getting a lot of deep thought from everybody on this! This is great! Ha.

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  8. I think a lot of countries have some form of fruit and bread(or noodle) they like, it is funny what we deem as breakfast food isn't so different many places.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, the more comments I get, the more that seems to be the case.

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  9. Oh, I do like your Grammar Nazi sign in the sidebar. I didn't notice it before. I have my Grammar Police badge: To serve and correct.

    Love,
    Janie

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  10. Maybe we should just all eat what Mr. Kimura eats for breakfast!

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    Replies
    1. Wow. Just... wow. I like the way you think, doll.

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    2. just about to serve dinner here...wonder what Mr. Kimura ate for dinner? The same as breakfast? ha.

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    3. We'll probably never know... unless he reads my blog. :)

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