Saturday, April 30, 2016

Z: Zebra



Here's my final listing for April's A-Z Challenge! And the theme is, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The Zebra first showed up in Pocket Comics #1, from Harvey Comics in 1941. His alter ego was John Doyle, a criminal lawyer framed by politicians and sent to jail. I like the way the blurb above says that The Zebra "battles criminals outside the law." Isn't that the way all criminals operate, technically?

A new Zebra, a/k/a Zebura, premiered -- as close as I can discover --  in something called Nidaime no Shigoto #123, a Japanese comic!




I'd like to thank all my new readers and followers, most of whom started with me early and kept up with me through the A to Z Challenge! I've enjoyed your blogs too, and have added most to my blogroll.

Thanks for your time, especially those who've read all 26 of my entries this month!



Friday, April 29, 2016

Y: Yellowjacket


Here's my penultimate listing for April's A-Z Challenge! And the theme is, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

Yellowjacket debuted in Yellowjacket Comics #1, in 1944, from Charlton. He was really Vince Harley, “one of those rare people that bees don’t sting.” Okayyyy...

The Modern-Age Yellowjacket, a/k/a Henry Pym, first appeared in The Avengers #59, from Marvel Comics in 1968! (Pym himself had first appeared  -- sans costume -- as "The Man in the Ant Hill!" in Tales to Astonish #27, in 1962. He next appeared -- in his superhero outfit as Ant-Man -- in Tales to Astonish #35, also in 1962!) In his superhero career, Pym has also gone by the names Giant-Man and Goliath, by the way!


Make sure you tune in tomorrow, fellow babies, to see the final installment in my A-Z Blogging Challenge!

Thanks for your time.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

X: Uhhh...

Here's my latest entry in this year's A-Z Blogging Challenge. My oh-so-specific theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

Today's letter is the letter "X." Only thing is -- and this ought to shock the crap out of you in an era where The X-Men and its 47 spin-offs are all over the modern comics landscape -- there was only one hero in the Golden Age of Comics (that I can find, anyway) whose "name" began with an X: X-9, better known as Secret Agent X-9. Secret Agent X-9 was a comic strip character who crossed into comic books and movies, but the name X-9 certainly was not given to any other characters. Ever.

As far as villains? All I could find were Xanuklhara (a Blackhawk enemy), Xnon (a Spectre foe), and Xog (who fought Captain Midnight)! And none of those names ever surfaced again, to my knowledge.

So, fellow babies, as far as what my extensive research shows, there IS no X in this series! So sorry...

But thanks for your time.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

W: Wonder Man



Today's entry for April's A-Z Blogging Challenge is "W." And my theme is, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The success of DC's Superman in 1938 started an explosion called the Golden Age of Comics. Superheroes were coming out of the woodwork, you might say, and some were blatant rip-offs of Superman. Comics legend Will Eisner was hired to create such a Superman clone for Wonder Comics #1, from Fox Features in 1939. His Wonder Man, a/k/a Fred Carson, was quickly sued out of existence. It didn't help that Eisner told the truth on the witness stand and admitted that his instructions were to create a Superman clone. (He ended up never getting paid for this particular gig, by the way!)

Years later, in The Avengers #9, 1964, Marvel Comics introduced their own character named Wonder Man. Simon Williams died in that same issue, but (as comics tend to do) was brought back to life years later!



Thanks for your time.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

V: Vigilante


Here's the "V" listing for the A-Z Blogging Challenge! And the theme is, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

Greg Sanders (changed to "Saunders" in the 1990s for some damned reason) was DC Comics' first Vigilante. A modern-day cowboy and radio star, he rode a motorcycle and fought crime with his twin six-guns, He first appeared in Action Comics #42, 1941.


A totally different Vigilante, Adrian Chase, showed up in The New Teen Titans Annual #2, published by DC in 1983.  A newer version of that character, Dorian Chase, was introduced in Nightwing vol. 2, #133, 2007.

Both the  Greg Sanders/Saunders Vigilante and the latter-day, costumed Vigilantes have appeared in modern times.

And thanks for your time.

Monday, April 25, 2016

U: Unknown Soldier


Here's my "U" listing for April's A-Z Challenge! And the theme is, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The Unknown Soldier first showed up in  Our Flag Comics #1, 1941. He had no alter ego, but could fly, had super-strength, and he carried a "nitro gun" which fired explosive bullets.

DC's Unknown Soldier was introduced in Star-Spangled War Stories #151, published in 1970. He was a facially-disfigured master of disguise.



Thanks for your time.

Saturday, April 23, 2016

T: Tarantula

Here's the "T" post for my A-Z Challenge. My theme? My theme, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

Does that costumed hero pictured above look a tad familiar? If so, it's probably because his costume resembles the second outfit worn by yesterday's superhero, the Golden Age Sandman! (And they were both published by DC Comics in the 1940s!) Check it out and see what I mean!

Anyway, as the title at the top of the splash panel tells you, that yellow-and-purple-garbed superhero is none other than The Tarantula, a/k/a Jonathan Law (I swear!), who first appeared in Star Spangled Comics #1, 1941

Years later, 1974 to be exact, Marvel Comics introduced a Tarantula of their own, only this guy was a baddie who oh-so-appropriately fought Spider-Man. He first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man #134.


Thanks for your time.

Friday, April 22, 2016

S: Sandman



Here's the new entry for my A-Z Challenge. My theme, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

DC comics has had a few characters called Sandman since the 1940s. The first, pictured above and below this paragraph, initially appeared in Adventure Comics #40, 1939. He was Wesley Dodds, and he ended up changing his uniform in Adventure Comics #69, to odd yellow and purple superhero togs.


I can't show any of the more recent DC Sandman characters, because that would be breaking my own rules about using updated characters for the A-Z Challenge! Instead, let me list Marvel Comic's villainous Sandman, who first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man #4, 1963! Flint Marko (a/k/a William Baker) was a criminal who'd escaped from prison. He wound up on a beach that had been a nuclear testing sight. Marko's body bonded with the radioactive sand, and since this is comics, he didn't die. Instead, he gained the power to turn himself into sand! (Marko later reformed, by the way.)


Thanks for your time.

Thursday, April 21, 2016

R: Ragman


Here's yet another entry in my A-Z Challenge for the month of April. My theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

The Ragman first appeared in Cat-Man Comics #1, 1940, from Holyoke. He was really Jay Garson, Jr.  Jay had no powers, but he disguised himself as a derelict to fool criminals! (Pretty spiffy suit, for a derelict...)

DC's Ragman premiered in Ragman #1, in 1976. His real name was Rory Regan. He had "the agility of a world class acrobat, the strength of a circus strongman and the fighting ability of a heavy weight prize fighter."


Thanks for your time.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Q: Quicksilver

 

And now, here's our regularly scheduled Q listing! My oh-so-specific theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

Another listing of a comic book couple -- umm, no, they didn't date -- one from the Golden Age and one from the Modern Age! And all in keeping with the A-Z Challenge! My oh-so-specific theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

Quicksilver debuted in National Comics #5, 1940, from Quality. He was never given any "real" name other than Max! His power was super-speed.

Today's hot-tempered Quicksilver, also a super-speedster, first appeared in The X-Men #4, 1964!


Thanks for your time.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

P: Phantom Rider


Due to a screw-up, O just posted!

Today's entry is for the letter P in this month's A-Z Challenge. My oh-so-specific theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

The Phantom Rider was a mysterious crime-fighter in the days of the old West. He first appeared in Wham Comics #1, from Centaur, in... you guessed it... 1940!*

Marvel Comics revived Magazine Enterprises' Ghost Rider in 1967, then changed his name several times over the years. There have also been quite a few people wearing the costume! At last report, he -- or she, because as I said, there've been several --was called the Phantom Rider. He first appeared in that role (technically) in  Marvel's Ghost Rider #1, 1967.



Thanks for your time.

*You guessed it if you've been following this series, that is!

Monday, April 18, 2016

O: Oracle


O was scheduled for Monday, and somehow got changed to draft form! Unfortunately, it didn't show up and I had no open library to go to on Monday due to a local holiday! Here it is!

Here's my latest entry in this year's A-Z Blogging Challenge. My oh-so-specific theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

The Oracle first showed up in Startling Comics 20, 1943, from Better Comics. His alter ego was Bob Paxton, and he could -- as his name implies -- foretell the future.

Barbara Gordon, formerly Batgirl, became Oracle after losing the use of her legs when brutally shot by the Joker. As Oracle, Barbara helps to fight crime from (relatively) behind the scenes. She first appeared (as Oracle) in DC's Suicide Squad #23, 1989.


Thanks for your time.

Saturday, April 16, 2016

N: Neon


Today brings us one more letter in April's A-Z Challenge! My theme is "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

Neon debuted in Hit Comics #1, 1940, from Quality Comics. If I may quote from The Golden Age Heroes Directory -- an invaluable source for SO many of these listings -- Neon "has 'neonic' powers, which boil down to glowing, being able to fly, and shooting bolts of energy from his hands."

Today's Neon is Celeste McCauley, a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes. She first appeared in DC's Legion of Super-Heroes Vol. 4, #6, 1990. Her body is composed of a Green Lantern's emerald energy, and can fly and fire force blasts like a Green Lantern..


Thanks for your time.


Friday, April 15, 2016

M: Mask




Here's the latest entry in the A-Z Challenge. My theme is "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The Golden Age Mask was Tony Colby, one of many District Attorneys who donned costumes and fought crime in the 1940s. He first appeared in Exciting Comics #1 (from Better Publications, 1940).

Stanley Ipkiss became a totally different Mask in Dark Horse Comics Presents #10, 1987. He wears "a magical mask which imbues the wearer with reality-bending powers and physical imperviousness, as well as bypassing the wearer's psychological inhibitions."


Thanks for your time.



Thursday, April 14, 2016

L: Lynx


Here's today's entry in the A-Z Challenge. My theme is "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The first appearance of The Lynx was in Mystery Men #14, from Fox Features, in 1940. He had no superpowers, and his secret identity was "Jim." Just Jim! Dorky costume, too!

A new Lynx appeared in DC's Robin #179 in 2008. She's a martial artist and weapons expert. That's about all I know, cuz she's so recent... and it may surprise you all to learn that I don't read modern comics. I quit following the new ones over ten years ago!



Thanks for your time.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

K: King


Here's today's entry in the A-Z Challenge. My theme is "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The King -- a/k/a King Standish -- was a crime-fighting, non-powered millionaire playboy who first appeared in 1940's Flash Comics #3 from National Periodicals (DC).

A new King first appeared -- as far as I could find -- in The King #1 from Jet City Comics, as recently as 2015. I couldn't find much information about him, sorry.



Thanks for your time.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

J: Jack Frost


Here's today's entry in the A-Z Challenge. My theme is "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."


Jack Frost -- no secret identity -- was a Timely (the original name of Marvel) Comics superhero (briefly revived in the 1970s), who first appeared in USA Comics #1, 1941. IIRC, he was supposed to be the "real" Jack Frost of legend, who came to the U.S.A. to fight crime. He can freeze things, and shoot icicles, basically.

Meet a newer Jack Frost, Gregor Shapanka, a different one from Marvel. This one was a villain, one of Iron Man's earliest foes, from Tales of Suspense #45, 1963. He later re-named himself Blizzard.




Thanks for your time.

Monday, April 11, 2016

I: Iron Munro


Here's the latest entry in my A-Z Challenge. My theme (as you ought to know by now if you've been paying attention) is "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

Iron Munro, who debuted in 1941 in  Army & Navy Comics #1, from Street & Smith, has been described as "a strapping young lad, a two-fisted adventurer of the future who flies from planet to planet doing good and fighting against evil." Whatta guy, huh?

Today's Iron Munro is a DC character, first appearing in Young All-Stars #1, in 1987. When DC changed their continuity and established that Superman never existed during the 1940s -- don't ask -- Iron Munro was created so they'd have someone similar around back then!


Thanks for your time.

Saturday, April 9, 2016

H: Hercules




Here's the latest entry in my A-Z Challenge. My theme? "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

This Hercules is not the original, mythological Olympian Hercules. He's actually Joe Hercules (I swear!), the "strongest man in history." (Convenient last name then, huh?) His premiere appearance was in Quality's Hit Comics #1, 1940.

(Wow. There are a lot of characters in this series that debuted in 1940, I've noticed!)

The modern-day Marvel Comics Hercules is the "real" one, the one from mythology. He first showed up to fight The Mighty Thor in Journey into Mystery Annual #1, 1965. His main power is his superhuman strength... and he's got an ego bigger than any muscle on his body.


Thanks for your time. 

Friday, April 8, 2016

G: Gargoyle


Here's the latest entry in my A-Z Challenge. My theme? "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The Gargoyle first appeared in Captain Aero #4, from Holyoke Comics, 1942. He was Dan Collins, described as a "playboy fashion plate." No powers. Just guns!

Today's Gargoyle is published by Marvel Comics. He was a transformed, elderly human named Isaac Christians, who first appeared in The Defenders #94, 1981.
.

Thanks for your time.

Thursday, April 7, 2016

F: Falcon


Here's the "F" entry in my A-Z Challenge theme, "Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters."

The Falcon -- no origin ever given -- was fighting young assistant District Attorney Carl Burgess. (I always wondered if the character was named after Golden Age Human Torch artist Carl Burgos, but we'll probably never know.) He first appeared in Timely's Human Torch Comics #2, 1940, and had no super powers, but he could glide around a lot....

The modern-day Falcon is Sam Wilson, partner to Captain America. He first appeared in Captain America #117, 1969. At first, he was a trained athlete with a pet Falcon, Redwing, but he later gained the power of flight and developed an almost psychic bond with his pet.


Tomorrow? "G!"

Thanks for your time.

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

E: Electro


Here's the latest entry in this year's A-Z Blogging Challenge. My oh-so-specific theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

Electro first appeared in Timely's Marvel Mystery Comics #4, 1940. Electro is a super-powered robot -- he can run 100 miles, can leap great distances, has super-strength, and is impervious to bullets and cannon-fire! -- created by Professor Philo Zog.


The modern-day Marvel Comics Electro, who first appeared in 1964's Amazing Spider-Man #9, is criminal Max Dillon.

Tomorrow: The letter "F!" Stay tuned!

Thanks for your time.

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

D: Daredevil



Here's my latest entry in this year's A-Z Blogging Challenge. My oh-so-specific theme: Golden Age Comic Book Characters with the Same Name As Modern-Day Characters.

I'm betting you've heard of this post's modern-day character even if you're not a comic book fan. In other words, first up today is Daredevil, whose premiere appearance was in Silver Streak #6, 1940. The original DD was Bart Hill, an orphan who'd been tortured by the criminals who killed his father, leaving Bart with a boomerang-shaped tattoo on his chest. Like Batman, he raised himself to be a superb athlete and began fighting crooks. Eventually, he got a kid gang to join in his exploits, a group called The Little Wise Guys. They eventually took over the title.

Marvel Comics' Daredevil is Matt Murdock, Attorney-at-Law, as revealed in Daredevil #1, 1964. When Matt was a boy, he pushed an elderly blind man out of the way of an oncoming truck. A radioactive canister fell off of the truck and struck young Matt in the face, causing him to lose his sight. In true comic book fashion, however, the radioactive cylinder gave Matt highly-developed hearing, sense of smell, sense of taste, sensitivity to touch, and something else described as a "radar sense!" Whew!
 


By the way, I should mention that several of the Golden Age characters I've described and/or will be describing in my A-Z Challenge were culled from a terrific website called The Golden Age Heroes Directory! Check it out!

And thanks for your time.

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